Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Prayer is really just another word for talking with God, and it’s a conversation that’s important for kids to understand. No matter how old we are, God hears our prayers and will answer them according to his perfect will! We’re never too young or too old to talk to God.

That’s why we want to share “Praying Around the World with Kate & Mack” with you. It’s a seven-day booklet that teaches kids interesting facts about languages of the world, the countries where they’re spoken, and even a bit about the cultures they represent. Most importantly, they get to learn simple ways to pray for people without the Bible!

Praying Around the World

You can use this guide for devotions with your kids, reading as a family at the breakfast or dinner table, or however else you’d like to work through it. And the best part is, the praying doesn’t have to stop once you’ve finished reading through the seven days! We’ll be sending an updated people group profile and prayer request once a month from here on out, so you and your kids can keep praying for people who are waiting for the Bible.

To download “Praying Around the World with Kate & Mack” and receive these monthly prayer requests, sign up at Wycliffe.org/A-Z.

Prayer is a conversation that matters. Let’s get started today!

“It is a surprise to me to hear someone reading the Word of God in Lubwisi,” said Kijanjaalo Christopher, a 72-year-old Babwisi man from Uganda. His community speaks Lubwisi as their heart language, though their Bibles don’t reflect that. “This was impossible for us to have the Word of God written in Lubwisi because, in terms of finance, we are not qualified because we are poor.”

Many Babwisi people have a real thirst for the Bible. Without Lubwisi Scripture, the church has struggled to develop strong leaders who can teach effectively. Pastor Bakasoma Michael said, “There is no way the Babwisi community will understand the Savior when they do not have the Lubwisi Bible, which they can understand. As pastors, we struggled to understand the words of the Bibles that are not in our language.”

Babwisi1

In recent years, God has answered the prayers of Kijanjaalo Christopher, Pastor Bakasoma Michael and countless other Babwisi people by providing four educated, dedicated Babwisi men to translate their Scriptures. Since 2006, the Babwisi have partnered with Wycliffe and the Seed Company in Bible translation. Today they’ve completed the New Testament and parts of the Old Testament, which will be dedicated in June 2015.

But the Babwisi need help getting the Bibles printed. Wycliffe is working with the Central Florida Christian Chamber of Commerce to print and deliver 5,000 Bibles to the Babwisi this summer, and you can help us. A donation of just $8.50 — less than the cost of eating one meal out — provides a Bible. Visit Bibles for Babwisi to learn how you can get involved today.

Do you live in the Orlando area or know someone who does? Then you won’t want to miss this announcement!

This summer, we’re excited to announce that Wycliffe will host a week-long program called “Summer Around the World With Kate & Mack” for elementary-aged kids. And we’d love for your kids to join us! The program will be July 20 to 24 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

So whether you’re still making your summer plans or know of someone who might want to send their kids to this day camp, we’d love to see you there! Sign your kids up so they can enjoy learning more about the world, playing games from different countries and making awesome crafts. For more details about registration, click here.

If you’re not in the Orlando area, don’t worry — Kate and Mack will still travel with your kids throughout the summer by email. If you haven’t already signed up for “Keeping Up With Kate,” we encourage you to do that here. Kate and Mack will be sharing their adventures with your kids all year long, and summer is a great time to get involved so you can find new, creative ways to keep your kids busy during their summer vacation.

So what are you waiting for? Come travel with us!

Summer Around the World

Featured Photo

Photo by Marc Ewell

 

Russian Orthodox believers light candles as they pray in a large church in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Services in Russian Orthodox churches are filled with visual, auditory and olfactory symbols: candle light reflecting from gilded icons; responsive chants led by choirs of priests; the smell of incense wafting up to vaulted ceilings. The Church in Russia has a long history, holding on to faith despite virtual hurricanes of political upheaval. Now a new and fresh breeze is blowing in Russia as churches everywhere increasingly take hold of their God-ordained role in sharing the Word both within and outside their own nation.

Ben and Mandy Pehrson met in college and soon realized they had a mutual interest in missions. Today they and their five kids live in a village in Papua New Guinea where they help facilitate Bible translation for 10 languages in the area. From the joys and sorrows to the triumphs and struggles, Ben and Mandy talk openly about what it’s like to raise a family as missionaries in a remote village.

Happy Easter to you and yours from Wycliffe USA! We pray you are blessed by the services and celebrations taking place this weekend, and that you can set aside time to reflect on who Christ is and how he demonstrates his love for us.

He is Risen

“Early on Sunday morning, as the new day was dawning, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went out to visit the tomb. Suddenly there was a great earthquake! For an angel of the Lord came down from heaven, rolled aside the stone, and sat on it. His face shone like lightning, and his clothing was as white as snow. The guards shook with fear when they saw him, and they fell into a dead faint. Then the angel spoke to the women. ‘Don’t be afraid!’ he said. ‘I know you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He isn’t here! He is risen from the dead, just as he said would happen.’” Matthew 28:1-6

Some people think our work ends with a Bible translation, but there’s more to it than that.

Here are some other key steps that help make a Bible translation successful:

Literacy

Many of the languages we work with have never been written down, so when a Bible translation finally becomes available, people are eager to learn how to read it. We’re able to help by training a few local teachers who can then pass on those literacy skills to others.

Scripture Use

When people get the Bible in their own language for the first time, they need help learning how to study it and apply it to their lives. Without this critical step, false teaching can quickly creep in as people take Scripture out of context, or Bibles may not be used at all. We address this need by providing consultants to work with local pastors and religious leaders who can then pass these skills on to their congregations.

Multilingual Education

Although we want to make sure that people have the Bible in their heart language, however isolated the group may be, it is also important to help those communities learn the language commonly used in their country. Just as we’ve seen literacy impact lives, multilingual education has too. Education is still done in their heart language, but over time they are introduced to the national languages to benefit their interactions and development. Local teachers play a huge part in this. Often times, we’ll train teachers from these isolated communities and they will be the ones teaching the children and the non-traditional students with multilingual education.

As we’ve said time and time again, there is so much more to translating the Bible than just the process of translation. Education and Scripture use programs are just scratching the surface of some of the things we do after a translation is complete, but they are really significant. Translation is just one step in this awesome road to transformation.

This post is part of our Wycliffe 101 series. Click here to read the previous post, or here to start at the beginning.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 423 other followers

%d bloggers like this: